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CULTURAL LEGACY OF CENTRAL ASIA IN JAPANESE MUSEUMS

CULTURAL LEGACY OF CENTRAL ASIA IN JAPANESE MUSEUMS

Description

Uzbekistan and Japan are separated by many thousands of kilometers, but in the cultural context, these countries are connected by the invisible threads of the greatest phenomenon in world history – the Great Silk Road. Many artifacts originating from the territory of Uzbekistan, or created by its natives, came to Japan as a result of migration or trade. The book-album Cultural Legacy of Central Asia in Japanese museums presents art objects related to the culture of Central Asia, including Uzbekistan, from the collections of seven Japanese museums. These are the Shosoin Imperial Treasury, Miho Museum, Yokohama Museum of Eurasian Cultures, Ryukoku Museum, Tenri University Sankokan Museum, Museum of Middle Eastern Art in Okayama and Hiroshima Prefectural Museum of Art. This is the first book that unites exhibits dedicated to Central Asia from several museums in Japan. The earliest objects dated to the late 3rd–early 2nd millennium BCE and associated with the Bactrian-Margian archaeological complex are stored in the Miho Museum. The museum also boasts a unique Sogdian burial bed, the decor of which tells about the lifestyle in the early Middle Ages. The Hiroshima Prefectural Museum of Art has a magnificent collection of suzani embroideries, which clearly demonstrate the sophistication of the culture of the Uzbek khanates.

CULTURAL LEGACY OF CENTRAL ASIA IN JAPANESE MUSEUMS

Description

Uzbekistan and Japan are separated by many thousands of kilometers, but in the cultural context, these countries are connected by the invisible threads of the greatest phenomenon in world history – the Great Silk Road. Many artifacts originating from the territory of Uzbekistan, or created by its natives, came to Japan as a result of migration or trade. The book-album Cultural Legacy of Central Asia in Japanese museums presents art objects related to the culture of Central Asia, including Uzbekistan, from the collections of seven Japanese museums. These are the Shosoin Imperial Treasury, Miho Museum, Yokohama Museum of Eurasian Cultures, Ryukoku Museum, Tenri University Sankokan Museum, Museum of Middle Eastern Art in Okayama and Hiroshima Prefectural Museum of Art. This is the first book that unites exhibits dedicated to Central Asia from several museums in Japan. The earliest objects dated to the late 3rd–early 2nd millennium BCE and associated with the Bactrian-Margian archaeological complex are stored in the Miho Museum. The museum also boasts a unique Sogdian burial bed, the decor of which tells about the lifestyle in the early Middle Ages. The Hiroshima Prefectural Museum of Art has a magnificent collection of suzani embroideries, which clearly demonstrate the sophistication of the culture of the Uzbek khanates.